One Hundred Dollars

One Hundred Dollars

Jake Blanchfield

5/9/18

Kelg 7

 

When I was eight, I needed a one-hundred dollar bill. I dreamed of dead presidents’ faces posted upon green bills. I was eager to unfold my Spongebob wallet and slide the cash inside.  Every Saturday morning I would wake up early and ponder for ways to make a few bucks. Pestering my mom for chores stopped working once I started dust mopping the house three times a day. She would only pay me five dollars a week no matter how many times I wiped the floor. I swiped a paper napkin and a marker from off of the kitchen table and sketched out how much longer it would take for me to earn one-hundred dollars. I found that it would take me five months to reach my goal. Waiting five months was not an option. It pained me after only one week.

The next day, while driving home from school, I noticed three blonde girls selling lemonade for 25 cents a pop. Their fold up table was positioned on the side of Montgomery, a road with a speed limit of 45 miles per hour. The girl trio had a line of paying customers. At that moment, I recognized how I would make $100. As soon as I got home, I bolted into the kitchen, swung the cabinet door open, and grabbed a jumbo pack of powdered lemonade. I prepared as much lemonade as I could. I didn’t think about gathering all of the other lemonade stand essentials such as Ice, change, and lemons. While making my sign, I inflated the price to one dollar for a small cup and two dollars for a jumbo cup. I instinctively knew to sell my product along a slow road in a wealthy area, unlike the blonde girls that set up shop next to a strip mall along a high-speed street. I lugged a foldable plastic table along with the lemonade products across half a mile of road. At 4:30 pm I opened for business for the first time, hoping to catch the rush hour traffic. My first sale occurred after only a few minutes of being in business. In no time cars lined up along the side of Rio Grande. After the rush hour buzz died down, I slid $197 in cash into my wallet.

Not much has changed since the lemonade sale days, except that my business expertise has scaled exponentially, along with revenues. In my sophomore year in high school, I transitioned my focus from lemonade stands to international online business. In late July of 2017, with two-hundred dollars of startup cash, I created my first online e-commerce business called, “Supreme Pride Store.” On supremepridestore.com, we sell merchandise to those in the LGBTQ community and give back to noble LGBTQ charities with a percentage of the profits. The lion’s share of my attention in online business has been on the marketing and sales side. Thanks to my marketing and sales ability, I’ve been able to reach three-thousand sales, and maintain a profit margin of 23%.  I’ve hired many part-time workers to occupy other moving parts such as customer service, graphics design, and photography. Managing my business and maintaining solid grades is the ultimate task, and comes with lots of sacrifices, but I would have it no other way.


 

Jake Blanchfield